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Biomedical Research

A Systematic Method of Testing, Tracking and Predicting Outbreaks Using a Global Database

The purpose of this proposal is to establish a systematic method of testing and tracking to prevent another pandemic. This method depends on the creation of a global database and the use of generic viral testing, antigen testing, and data analysis prediction models. Implementing a standard method of testing at various ports of entry will help prevent the recurrence of another pandemic.

Abstract

The purpose of this proposal is to establish a systematic method of testing and tracking to prevent another pandemic. This method depends on the creation of a global database and the use of generic viral testing, antigen testing, and data analysis prediction models. Essentially, this will (a) detect whether a person has contracted a specific disease or virus, (b) detect the severity of the disease within an infected person, (c) provide data for further research on the vaccine or treatment of certain diseases, analyze (d) percentage of population affected by a certain disease and (e) predict which part of the world may experience an outbreak of a certain disease.

Introduction

The COVID-19 global pandemic has impacted the world, by causing numerous deaths, negatively impacting economies, and bringing unemployment rates to a historical high. Implementing a standard method of testing at various ports of entry, such as border control, with testing for different infectious diseases will help prevent the recurrence of another pandemic. 

Testing 

The subject’s DNA sample and general information (ie. recent places visited, and if they have been recently infected with a contagious disease) would be collected. The DNA sample would be sent to the cloud, a database with DNA samples (from various countries organizations and companies) of different contagious diseases. The cloud would have DNA samples of the specific strains of each disease and the different densities for each disease. If the subject is tested positive for a specific disease, the DNA sample will also be matched with a specific density. Based on the results of this, the viral exposure density of the initial stage will determine the severity of the disease within a person. The individual will receive a specific course of treatment. If the positively-tested individual recovers, they may be randomly asked to take an antibody test to provide further data about the immunity against specific diseases. 

Tracking and Predicting

By constantly analyzing the data, researchers can track the diseases that are affecting the majority of the population. The general information would help researchers in using data analysis prediction models to predict where a specific outbreak could occur. 

Potential Pitfalls and Solutions

Privacy is a major issue, as people may not be willing to voluntarily share their data. A potential solution includes the creation of a policy to ensure the security of people’s data. Additionally, genomic sequencing is an expensive method. Alternative methods such as PCR and qPCR can be used instead. However, these methods come with some disadvantages, as PCR may produce false negative and positive results. PCR, qPCR, and genomic sequencing can each be tested individually to decide which is more beneficial.

Conclusion

Although the world has been impacted by COVID-19 global pandemic, this does not mean that COVID-19 is the only disease that can cause a pandemic in the future. Any other contagious disease without a vaccine can potentially cause a pandemic. A systematic method of testing and tracking to prevent outbreaks will decrease the chances of another pandemic.

Works Cited

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